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Teaching and learning in HPE

Linking the underlying concepts (UCs) to the key areas of learning (KALs)

Students develop their understanding of the concepts that underpin the curriculum as they work towards curriculum objectives during class units of work. The following examples illustrate how the underlying concepts can contribute to teaching and learning in the food and nutrition key area of learning.

Well-being, Hauora in a food and nutrition unit

Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999), states, on page 40, that students:

 

...will have opportunities to examine the influence of food and nutrition in relation to the physical, social, mental and emotional, and spiritual dimensions of hauora.

Example: The learning experiences described under the heading 'Food to Go and Grow', on page 14 of Healthy People Eat Healthy Food, could help students in years 1–3 to understand how food and nutrition relate to the dimension of hauora. During these activities, students examine the reasons why they eat, and consider how healthy eating can contribute to their physical and emotional wellbeing.

Health promotion in a food and nutrition unit

Through health promotion, students can contribute to:

 

... a school environment that encourages healthy eating ...
(Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999), page 40)
  

Example: The learning experiences described under the heading 'Putting It All Together', on page 20 of Choice Food!, encourage students in years 7–8 to think critically about the food eaten at school, and to take steps to promote healthy eating in their school community.

Socio-ecological perspective

Using the socio-ecological perspective, students will:

 

... examine the influences of culture, technology, and society on food choices and eating patterns.
(Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999), page 40)

Example: The learning experiences described under the heading 'I Know What You're Trying to Do to Me!', on page 16 of Choice Food!, could help students in years 7–8 to investigate, through the socio-ecological perspective, the changing factors that affect people's food choices.

Attitudes and values

People often form positive attitudes and values as a result of experiences that they enjoy. In this key area of learning, students:

 

... will have practical experiences designed to help them develop health-enhancing attitudes to food and nutrition.
(Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999), page 40) 

Example: The learning experiences described under the heading 'I Know What I Need!', on page 18 of Choice Food!, enable students to demonstrate, in the course of practical cooking activities, that they are taking personal responsibility for their choice of foods.


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