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Making Meaning

Making a Difference

Introduction

This book, one of the series The Curriculum in Action, is designed to build on what students learned through levels 1–5 of Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999). It provides teachers with ideas for planning and implementing programmes for students working at levels 6–8 of the curriculum in health education, physical education, and home economics.
Two underlying concepts

Making Meaning: Making a Difference focuses on two of the underlying concepts of Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999) – the socio-ecological perspective and health promotion. At levels 6–8 of the curriculum, students examine aspects of the socio-ecological perspective and health promotion in more depth than at earlier levels. Suggestions for teaching these two underlying concepts within a range of contexts are provided in the 'Learning experiences: Health education' section. Links are also made throughout the learning experiences to some NCEA level 1–3 achievement standards for health education, physical education, and home economics.

Making Meaning: Making a Difference explains how teachers can use approaches based on critical thinking and critical action when applying the socio-ecological perspective and practising health promotion in their teaching and learning.

Background material on the socio-ecological perspective and on theories that relate to health promotion is provided in the 'Sociological perspectives and health promotion' section. Some of this material provides key content for a particular part of a course (for example, students who are preparing for assessment against Health Achievement Standard 3.5 need to know about the links between models of health education and health promotion). It is recommended that not only teachers of health but all teachers working with Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999) become familiar with the theoretical background to both of these underlying concepts.

Although the focus of this book is on the socio-ecological perspective and health promotion, the other two underlying concepts of the curriculum – hauora (well-being) and attitudes and values – are equally important at levels 6–8. Students can develop an understanding of hauora and explore their attitudes and values through the learning experiences suggested in this book.

Key areas of learning

Programmes developed for student learning based on Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999) should reflect the range of learning opportunities suggested in the key areas of learning set out in the curriculum statement. In Making Meaning: Making a Difference, selected contexts from these key areas of learning have been used to provide a focus for teaching and learning about the concepts of the socio-ecological perspective and health promotion.

Using the activities

This resource provides a range of activities that illustrate how the socio-ecological perspective and health promotion can be incorporated into units of work. Although a sequence of activities is sometimes suggested, the activities represent examples only, and they should not be seen as comprising complete units of work.

The activities are set out under the headings of 'Health Education', 'Physical Education', and 'Home Economics', although some activities may be used in more than one area. For example, the activities for learning about determinants of health, while essential for health education, could also be used in a physical education or home economics programme. Similarly, food activities from the home economics section could be included in health education programmes for students who are not studying home economics.

In each school, while teachers of the three subject areas will need to collaborate to ensure that their programmes do not involve unnecessary repetition for students, teachers are encouraged to consider using relevant activities from all sections of the book since the processes described can be applied across all three areas.

Linking to Curriculum
Key concepts
Socio-ecological perspective
Considerations for learning
Teaching and learning environments
Teaching and learning approaches
Planning considerations
Health education
Physical education
Home economics
Health education
Physical education
Home economics
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
References


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