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Intended outcomes: Home economics

What do your students need to learn in home economics in order to make a difference?

Gather and analyse information on what your students need to learn about the socio-ecological perspective and the concept of health promotion. This will help you to identify the knowledge and understandings, skills and strategies, and attitudes and values that they need to develop in senior home economics programmes.

Listed below are the intended learning outcomes that relate to the home economics learning experiences. You could draw on these outcomes and on the relevant NCEA achievement standards (through the links given at the beginning of each learning experience) to establish goals and criteria with your students and to provide them with feedback about their progress.

Home economics learning outcomes

Level

Strand

AO

distinguish between real and perceived food-handling risks in the school environment and develop strategies to take appropriate action at either the school level or a personal level to address these risks (see 'Advocating for change'). 6 A 3
evaluate school and community initiatives to promote safe food-handling practices and develop an action plan to address any areas of concern about food-handling practices (see 'Advocating for change'). 6 D 2
critically analyse societal attitudes to and expectations about food availability that affect people's awareness of their personal identity and sense of self-worth in a range of life situations (see 'Food security'). 7 A 4
analyse the beliefs, attitudes, and practices that shape people's perceptions of food-security issues and identify possible strategies to bring about change (see 'Food security'). 7 C 2
analyse and evaluate the attitudes and interpersonal skills that enable people to participate fully and effectively as community members in a sustainable society (see 'Food security'). 8 C 3
critically analyse the impacts that the globalisation of food has on personal, cultural, and national identity and on people's well-being (see 'Globalisation'). 8 A 4
critically analyse the interrelationships between people, industry, technology, and legislation that affect the nutritional health and well-being of community groups (see 'Food security'). 8 D 4
analyse the effects that laws, policies, and regulations have on the nutritional health and well-being of a community group in terms of social justice (see 'Food security'). 7 D 3
promote health by taking action to increase awareness of how food choices affect the health and well-being of a community group (see 'Food security'). 8 D 3
critically analyse a range of qualitative and quantitative data in order to evaluate weight-reducing diets and products in terms of their effects on well-being (see 'Addressing the balance'). 8 A 4
critically analyse the interrelationships between people, industry, technology, and legislation that affect the nutritional health of a population (see 'Food security'). 8 D 4
analyse ways in which children's well-being and the environments in which they live are affected by new technologies (see 'Child development and new technologies'). 7 D 4
demonstrate understanding of the responsible behaviours required to ensure that the physical, mental and emotional, social, and spiritual well-being of children using the Internet is managed safely (see 'Child development and new technologies'). 7 A 3
develop a plan of action to advocate for the implementation of strategies and/or services that can address an identified issue (see 'Child development and new technologies'). 8 D 3

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