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Underlying Concepts

This page describes ways that the underlying concepts of the document Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999) can be addressed through teaching Sport Studies – a key area of learning.

PDF icon. Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999) (PDF, 688 KB)

Hauora and Sport Studies

Sport studies offers opportunities for both the individual and the wider society to achieve hauora, through addressing development in the dimensions; taha tinana, taha wairua, taha whānau, and taha hinengaro. For more information refer to Hauora in the document Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (1999)

Taha tinana – physical well-being
For example through participating in physically active games and sport, warm-ups, stretching, use of safety equipment, avoiding physical injury.

Taha whānau – social well-being
For example through being part of a team, playing with and against others.

Taha wairua – spiritual well-being
For example seeking personal identity and meaning through meeting challenges in games and sport.

Taha hinengaro – mental and emotional well-being
For example learning strategies / tactics for particular games, respecting self and others, and taking diverse sporting roles.

Health Promotion and Sport Studies

The concept of health promotion implies positive action towards health as opposed to treatment of illness.

Health promotion incorporates principles of:

  • affirming diversity,
  • social justice, and
  • supportive environments.

Sport studies provide opportunities for students to reflect on their attitudes and behaviours toward these three principles, and take action to establish supportive practices, policies, programmes, and environments.

Sport studies provides opportunities for students to:

  • understand how the environments in which they learn and play can affect their own personal well-being and that of society;
  • develop skills that empower them to take action to improve personal and societal well-being;
  • help to develop supportive links between the school and the wider community;
  • help to develop supportive practices to ensure physical and emotional safety for those they play with.

For more information refer to Health Promotion in the document Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum

A Socio-ecological Perspective and Sport Studies

Sports studies allow the assumptions, on which physical education is based, to be exposed and challenged.

A socio-ecological view connects the individual to influences in the wider society, and recognises that physical education and sport cultures are not divorced from broader social, political, economic and cultural relations.

The representation of sport as mass culture is a major force in the construction of social life. Influences such as these, impact on how young people make sense and meaning of sport and physical activity as they experience it, how they use, shape and exercise their bodies, and how sport in society tends to advantage already dominant individuals and groups.

Sports studies provides opportunities for students to:

  • critique information contained in the media which focuses on sport, health, and body image;
  • extend, and critically appraise the deliberate use of play, exercise, sport and other forms of physical activity, within individual and social contexts;
  • demonstrate responsibility to actively contribute to their own well-being and that of other people.

For more information refer to The Socio-ecological Perspective in the document Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum

Attitudes and Values and Sport Studies

Sports studies provides a context through which students can develop an understanding of how personal identity and life-skills, that promote independence, autonomy, and feelings of self-worth, are important to well-being.

Sport studies provides opportunities for students to:

  • self-challenge and achieve mastery, thereby enhancing feelings of competence and self-worth.;
  • develop self-determination, thereby enhancing responsibility for participation and achievement;
  • give appropriate encouragement and technical feedback, thereby enhancing honest social support systems;
  • experience fun and excitement, thereby enhancing attitudes of pleasure and stimulation;
  • reflect on competition and comparison that, for some students, can have negative in consequences.

For more information refer to Attitudes and Values in the document Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum


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