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Intended outcomes: Level 3

Level

Curriculum

Strand

Through te ao kori learning experiences, students could:

3 Dance PK explore the use of poi while moving different parts of the body, at different levels and in different directions
3 Dance PK combine and contrast different stepping patterns used in kapa haka (performance group)
3 Dance   DI CI select and combine rhythmic and expressive movements and chanting to portray messages through haka
3 HPE A3  identify and use safe practice and basic risk management in raupō (bulrush) and rito (centre shoot of a plant, such as flax) throwing games
3 HPE A3 identify and use tikanga when learning and using stepping patterns
3 HPE A4 describe how their own feelings, beliefs, and actions in te ao kori activities, and those of others, contribute to their personal self-worth and hauora (well-being)
3 HPE B1 develop complex stepping pattern sequences
3 HPE B1 develop more complex movement sequences in haka
3 HPE   B3 play minor games using parts of plants to develop throwing, catching, and dodging skills
3 HPE C3 identify pressures that can influence interactions with others and demonstrate assertiveness strategies to manage these when working in a group in te ao kori contexts
3 HPE D2 participate in a haka performance and describe how addressing the issue portrayed in the performance could enhance their own well-being and that of the school community
3 Visual Arts PK apply understanding of line, shape, and form to make string figures
3 Visual Arts CI describe the ideas conveyed by particular string figures
3 Visual Arts UC talk about the situations in which string games were played in various societies and times and the purpose they served
1–3  Dance UC DI initiate and express dance ideas based on selected stories about Māui-tikitiki-a-taranga
1–3 Music PK DI UC explore vocal sounds, body percussion, and found sounds and apply to suit the context
1–4 Dance   PK explore the element of relationships, in pairs and small groups
1–4 Dance CI   share movement and dance through informal and/or formal presentation
1–4 Dance CI respond personally to their own and others' dances in written and/or verbal forms
1–4 Music PK UC explore and respond to the elements and expressive qualities of music through listening, moving, and chanting
1–4 Music DI CI UC identify and compare ways of maintaining and enhancing relationships when working in cooperative group activities in te ao kori
1–4 Music CI UC   perform waiata-ā-ringa (action songs) paying attention to breath, pitch, rhythm, and kaupapa (strategy, theme)
2–3 Dance DI create and share tī rākau (stick) movements and sequences
2–3 Dance DI initiate and express dance ideas based on 'flight' words
2–3 Music UC demonstrate an understanding of the tikanga and wairua (spirit) involved in performing haka
2–4 Dance PK explore the ways in which a prop, that is, tī rākau (stick), can be used to develop body and space awareness
2–4 Dance CI   respond to their own tī rākau (stick) sequences and to those of others
2–4 Dance UC understand how tī rākau (stick) is used in Māori culture
2–4  Dance
Music
CI
PK
perform poi sequences for an audience in time to music
2–4 Dance Music CI
PK
perform takahi stepping patterns in time to music
2–4 Dance
Music
CI
PK
perform tī rākau (stick) sequences for an audience in time with music
2–4  Dance
Music
DI CI
DI CI UC
create and perform group dances and rhythmic chants based on the concept of kotahitanga (working as one)
2–4 Dance
Music
DI CI
DI CI UC
reflect on their experiences and the concept of kotahitanga (working as one) in dance and music
2–4 Music PK CI UC perform a waiata-ā-ringa (action song), singing in tune and in time with each other
2–4 Music PK UC describe the characteristics and purposes of music in a range of contexts and settings
2–4 Music UC demonstrate an understanding of the tikanga and wairua (spirit) involved in performing a waiata (song)
3–4 Dance PK DI select, combine, and use elements of dance and use choreography to develop ideas about te ao kori
3–4 Dance PK DI CI UC research Māori mythology and customary and contemporary Māori art and show understanding of these through dance and movement performance
3–4 Dance PK UC demonstrate an understanding of the tikanga relating to the pūkeko step pattern
3–4 Dance PK UC  identify the characteristics of the pūkeko and explore the step patterns of the pūkeko through locomotive movement
3–4 Dance PK UC explore, describe, and experience how haka is used in Māori culture
3–4 Dance DI use haka vocabulary and choreographic devices to create a haka that communicates a social issue
3–4 Dance CI present their dances about te ao kori within their school community and record their responses to their own and others' dances
3–4 Dance CI perform and respond to poi dances
3–4 Dance CI perform a dance about Māui for an audience and reflect upon this experience
3–4 Dance CI UC participate in a haka performance and describe how addressing the issue portrayed in the performance could enhance their own well-being and that of the school community
3–4 Dance UC research the representations of Tāne Mahuta and read about Tāne Mahuta as the guardian of trees and birds and of all things in the forest to inform ideas for dance
3–4 Dance
Music
CI
CI UC
perform a waiata-ā-ringa (action song) for a particular purpose
3–4 Dance
Music 
UC
UC
describe what a waiata-ā-ringa (action song) is and why it is performed
3–4  Music PK DI respond to and interpret music through experimentation with patterns and structural composition devices using poi as percussive instruments
3–4 Music PK CI UC perform (move and chant) rhythmically and expressively
3–4 Music  PK CI UC perform poi dances responsively to music
3–4   Music PK UC select and combine rhythmic and expressive movements and chanting to portray messages through

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